Standerwick Long

Interview

Standerwick: The “Time And Effort Of A Live Show”

Standerwick reveals his live show set-up, back to back sets and so much more.

| by | Features, Interviews

Bristol based artist Standerwick (Ian) has entered the Trance scene and had a meteoric rise to the top with is releases. Working alongside labels such as Armada Music, Garuda and many others, he has collaborated with some of the best and showcased himself as an artist who is here to stay, in the short space of time it has taken him. Talking first, it was time to focus on Bristol and how influential the city was for Standerwick in starting out within dance music.

“Definitely. A few decades ago when I started doing music, it was a hotspot for a lot of people. I grew up in my music career with Portishead, Massive Attack and plenty of other people, it was quite a huddle of producers with genres way across the board. So yeah, it was very inspirational to be living there and knowing these people”.

Hailing from the UK, it has been a country where dance music has suffered in recent years with club closures, the threat of developers to clubs and other such issues, such as government policies and policing issues. It has seen a bit of change and it is also worth noting that more and more people are becoming involved in the scene, with plenty of pop-up nights, local start outs and more talented people.

“From the time that I have spent in dance music, there has definitely been a resurgence. I come from a rock background so I jumped into dance music about fifteen years ago, what it was like before that, I can’t comment. But certainly from what I’ve seen in the last decade or so, it has definitely grown. Especially when you arrive at a show, and you see a queue a couple of hundred yards down the road, four deep, it’s something which you look at and think I haven’t seen this in a while. So if that is anything to go by, it’s looking good.”

For Standerwick, the last few years have saw him burst into the limelight with a number of successful accolades to his name. Numerous Beatport number one’s, sold out shows and a very hectic schedule, it was time to see how the last few years had been for the artist.

“Sometimes it really feels like a whirlwind and then sometimes you don’t really realise how far you have come. I give the scenario if you have a child, you know they are growing but you don’t how much they have grown. Unless you see a friends child, who you haven’t seen for six months, and you look and think how big they are, and the parent says, are they? So yeah it’s kind of like that. So sometimes I do take stock sometimes and when I get a chance, I look at all of this and think of everything I have achieved.”

In terms of a DJ, there is a whole different scenario when performing a show by yourself, and then performing a show with someone else. As there are so many talented artists now, it’s hard to put everyone on the line up, so the growth of back to back sets has risen. During Amsterdam Dance Event, Standerwick was performing a back to back show with Ben Gold.

“Back to back shows, if you are paired up with the right person, can be absolutely amazing. They are really good fun, I’ve done a back to back show with Ben Gold at the 02 in Bournemouth, and that was a lot of fun. We actually streamed that off one of our phones funny enough on the ASOT Instagram live channel so to do it again, it’s a lot of fun.

The dynamics of playing with someone is a completely different ball game than playing on your own. You relax a lot more for sure, you enjoy it a lot more than playing on your own, because there is more stress on your own if it’s a big show. I know Ben as well, we gel really well because the dynamics are right. And we talk about the music we are going to play, and bounce off each other.

Which led into the conversation about track selection and how this differs when performing a back to back set. “What we tend to do, and I do this for my own shows as well, rather than have a set playlist, we create a Dropbox folder and drop a load of tracks into it, say to each other that will work, that won’t work and narrow it down to around thirty tunes or so. So we have a playlist, dip into it and we have a lot of our own tunes, collaborations we have produced together so it’s safe to say we aren’t short of tracks anyway.

Coming to the end of 2017 and looking towards the new year, for an artist, you have to be planning ahead. This year has been filled with huge Standerwick tracks, many being received on the scene very well indeed. So it was time to see what he had planned for the rest of the year and coming into the new year in terms of music and his solo career.

“Yeah I’ve got things planned for the rest of this year and into early next year so a few concrete plans. I’ve obviously released tracks which I’m really pleased with this year but the focus is on my live show which I’m rolling out. I’m putting a lot of time and effort into my live shows, because the effort and time put into a live show is so much more than making a track. It takes weeks and weeks of planning because there is so much which could go wrong that you really have to rehearse.

I’ve done two shows this year already, one in Leeds and one at Exchange in Los Angeles with live vocalists such as Jonathan Mendelsohn. And I’ve one to perform in Avalon in Los Angeles, which is a Standerwick live show, so it’s just me and my tunes.

With so much focus on the live show, it was time to see what was going on behind the scenes of this. Planning, preparing, rehearsals and so much more all goes into this, and obviously, you need the equipment to carry out all of this. Standerwick talked about the equipment, logistics of this and making sure everything was in place for his show and his set-up.

“I recently undertook an ambassadorship with Roland so basically I’m exclusively using their equipment. So I had a V-Drum set up custom made for me on stands, which slotted over the top of my DJ gear. This stopped a big changeover, cut out a lot of tech guys come on and bring the equipment all in, I wanted something which I could bring in and changeover in thirty seconds, and the stands were made to the millimetre. But now this has all changed as I’m taking more synths with me and a few other bits of kit and now it’s a bit more complicated.

In terms of the live element, I remaster all of my tracks and I remove all of the elements I’m going to play. Obviously if I could play all of the instruments, I could but there is only so much I can do, unless I grow more arms. So all of the important parts of the track, like the big lead lines or bass line, I remove these and that is what I do within my live shows.”

Standerwick, with his live shows, new music and a whole lot going on in his schedule, has a lot to look forward to over the new few months and into 2018. But it was important to find out his one piece of advice, especially as he came from a rock background and the transition into dance music.

“A motto which I’ve always maintained in music, is that you have to put the time in, get your head down and work hard. That’s a motto I’ve always stuck to. There are no back doors into this music scene, it’s very hard, learn the equipment that you have such as Ableton or Logic. Learn the basics, learn synthesis and reference your music against tracks which you like, and see about how they compare. Comparing A against B works and you look at areas such as compression or EQ because that’s how I did it. So yeah, that’s what I would say.”

That rounded off the interview with Standerwick but we sat and chatted for quite a long time after this, as Ian got prepared to jet off to LA. He has a whole host of things to look forward to in the new year and it was great to get a chat outside of the job as well. The transition has certainly been nailed from rock to dance, and there doesn’t look like there is much going to stop the artist.

For more information on Standerwick:
https://www.facebook.com/standerwickmusic/
https://twitter.com/Ianstanderwick
https://soundcloud.com/standerwick

Photo Source: StanderwickFB

Standerwick Long

Standerwick.

Bristol based artist Standerwick (Ian) has entered the Trance scene and had a meteoric rise to the top with is releases. Working alongside labels such as Armada Music, Garuda and many others, he has collaborated with some of the best and showcased himself as an artist who is here to stay, in the short space of time it has taken him. Talking first, it was time to focus on Bristol and how influential the city was for Standerwick in starting out within dance music.

“Definitely. A few decades ago when I started doing music, it was a hotspot for a lot of people. I grew up in my music career with Portishead, Massive Attack and plenty of other people, it was quite a huddle of producers with genres way across the board. So yeah, it was very inspirational to be living there and knowing these people”.

Hailing from the UK, it has been a country where dance music has suffered in recent years with club closures, the threat of developers to clubs and other such issues, such as government policies and policing issues. It has seen a bit of change and it is also worth noting that more and more people are becoming involved in the scene, with plenty of pop-up nights, local start outs and more talented people.

Standerwick.

“From the time that I have spent in dance music, there has definitely been a resurgence. I come from a rock background so I jumped into dance music about fifteen years ago, what it was like before that, I can’t comment. But certainly from what I’ve seen in the last decade or so, it has definitely grown. Especially when you arrive at a show, and you see a queue a couple of hundred yards down the road, four deep, it’s something which you look at and think I haven’t seen this in a while. So if that is anything to go by, it’s looking good.”

For Standerwick, the last few years have saw him burst into the limelight with a number of successful accolades to his name. Numerous Beatport number one’s, sold out shows and a very hectic schedule, it was time to see how the last few years had been for the artist.

“Sometimes it really feels like a whirlwind and then sometimes you don’t really realise how far you have come. I give the scenario if you have a child, you know they are growing but you don’t how much they have grown. Unless you see a friends child, who you haven’t seen for six months, and you look and think how big they are, and the parent says, are they? So yeah it’s kind of like that. So sometimes I do take stock sometimes and when I get a chance, I look at all of this and think of everything I have achieved.”

Standerwick.

In terms of a DJ, there is a whole different scenario when performing a show by yourself, and then performing a show with someone else. As there are so many talented artists now, it’s hard to put everyone on the line up, so the growth of back to back sets has risen. During Amsterdam Dance Event, Standerwick was performing a back to back show with Ben Gold.

“Back to back shows, if you are paired up with the right person, can be absolutely amazing. They are really good fun, I’ve done a back to back show with Ben Gold at the 02 in Bournemouth, and that was a lot of fun. We actually streamed that off one of our phones funny enough on the ASOT Instagram live channel so to do it again, it’s a lot of fun.

The dynamics of playing with someone is a completely different ball game than playing on your own. You relax a lot more for sure, you enjoy it a lot more than playing on your own, because there is more stress on your own if it’s a big show. I know Ben as well, we gel really well because the dynamics are right. And we talk about the music we are going to play, and bounce off each other.

Standerwick.

Which led into the conversation about track selection and how this differs when performing a back to back set. “What we tend to do, and I do this for my own shows as well, rather than have a set playlist, we create a Dropbox folder and drop a load of tracks into it, say to each other that will work, that won’t work and narrow it down to around thirty tunes or so. So we have a playlist, dip into it and we have a lot of our own tunes, collaborations we have produced together so it’s safe to say we aren’t short of tracks anyway.

Coming to the end of 2017 and looking towards the new year, for an artist, you have to be planning ahead. This year has been filled with huge Standerwick tracks, many being received on the scene very well indeed. So it was time to see what he had planned for the rest of the year and coming into the new year in terms of music and his solo career.

“Yeah I’ve got things planned for the rest of this year and into early next year so a few concrete plans. I’ve obviously released tracks which I’m really pleased with this year but the focus is on my live show which I’m rolling out. I’m putting a lot of time and effort into my live shows, because the effort and time put into a live show is so much more than making a track. It takes weeks and weeks of planning because there is so much which could go wrong that you really have to rehearse.

Standerwick.

I’ve done two shows this year already, one in Leeds and one at Exchange in Los Angeles with live vocalists such as Jonathan Mendelsohn. And I’ve one to perform in Avalon in Los Angeles, which is a Standerwick live show, so it’s just me and my tunes.

 

With so much focus on the live show, it was time to see what was going on behind the scenes of this. Planning, preparing, rehearsals and so much more all goes into this, and obviously, you need the equipment to carry out all of this. Standerwick talked about the equipment, logistics of this and making sure everything was in place for his show and his set-up.

“I recently undertook an ambassadorship with Roland so basically I’m exclusively using their equipment. So I had a V-Drum set up custom made for me on stands, which slotted over the top of my DJ gear. This stopped a big changeover, cut out a lot of tech guys come on and bring the equipment all in, I wanted something which I could bring in and changeover in thirty seconds, and the stands were made to the millimetre. But now this has all changed as I’m taking more synths with me and a few other bits of kit and now it’s a bit more complicated.

Standerwick.

In terms of the live element, I remaster all of my tracks and I remove all of the elements I’m going to play. Obviously if I could play all of the instruments, I could but there is only so much I can do, unless I grow more arms. So all of the important parts of the track, like the big lead lines or bass line, I remove these and that is what I do within my live shows.”

Standerwick, with his live shows, new music and a whole lot going on in his schedule, has a lot to look forward to over the new few months and into 2018. But it was important to find out his one piece of advice, especially as he came from a rock background and the transition into dance music.

“A motto which I’ve always maintained in music, is that you have to put the time in, get your head down and work hard. That’s a motto I’ve always stuck to. There are no back doors into this music scene, it’s very hard, learn the equipment that you have such as Ableton or Logic. Learn the basics, learn synthesis and reference your music against tracks which you like, and see about how they compare. Comparing A against B works and you look at areas such as compression or EQ because that’s how I did it. So yeah, that’s what I would say.”

Standerwick.

That rounded off the interview with Standerwick but we sat and chatted for quite a long time after this, as Ian got prepared to jet off to LA. He has a whole host of things to look forward to in the new year and it was great to get a chat outside of the job as well. The transition has certainly been nailed from rock to dance, and there doesn’t look like there is much going to stop the artist.

For more information on Standerwick:
https://www.facebook.com/standerwickmusic/
https://twitter.com/Ianstanderwick
https://soundcloud.com/standerwick

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