Riddim Commission Press

Interview

Riddim Commission: Fusing House And Grime

Riddim Commission talk House, Grime and their recently released album 'Riddim. Bass. Life'.

| by | Features, Interviews

The UK Grime scene is one which is exploding at the moment as more and more artists break through to the mainstream music industry. However Riddim Commission, a House duo, have built a sound of fusing House with Grime, and the two have been hand in hand. The duo have just released their brand new album ‘Riddim. Bass. Life.’ which features a number of notable Grime names, and the support already has been incredible.

Taking things back to the start of your careers, tell us a little about how Riddim Commission came about. Where did you both meet? 

Marco reached out to me to remix a track of his called ‘Ho’. I was coming off the back of ‘StreetFighter Riddim’ for D Double and brought in P Money for the Ho Riddim remix. P killed it and the label and Marco decided to make it the main version.

Was this always the direction you both wanted to go down, enter the world of dance music, produce your own tracks and perform these tracks?

When we started working together, it was always electronic, with grime and bass. After a while writing together we naturally gravitated to house tempos. To play your own productions out is the ultimate buzz, and to have the artists performing the tracks at the same time is the one. It’s what we are aiming for in our live sets.

Hailing from London, how influential was the city in influencing the sound you produce? It’s a mixture of House with grime elements.

London is such a melting pot of all kinds of culture it has to be a major influence.  We love to mix the styles in our music, house, bass, grime, hiphop, garage…the list goes on.  This hybrid is what makes the UK scene so special.

The grime scene has seen a massive rise in support as it enters the mainstream charts due to the success of Stormzy and other such artists. Do you believe that more and more artists will begin to feature grime elements, such as Riddim Commission?

You can’t beat grime for the level of energy it brings to raves, and festivals plus it’s UK born. I’m sure you’ll see more and more grime artists featuring on projects outside of grime. As long as grime exists in its raw state in addition to the collaborations outside of the scene that’s a good thing. We are just focusing on doing our style and working with the artists we are really into across the board.

You have recently released your brand new album ‘Riddim. Bass. Life’. How easy did you find it to sit down in the studio and produce twelve tracks? Was there a stage where you lost belief in the project?

It wasn’t easy. Whenever you collaborate with artists you have to be aware of their schedule, their releases and things they have going on in their lives too. It took a couple of years to complete, write the tracks, secure the artists and decide what did and didn’t make the cut. It’s a great feeling knowing that we did it. There’s a reason why decent albums take time.  You need to have a lot of patience and be focused on finishing what you can when you can. Some stuff is out of your hands so you have to try not to sweat that.

I also wanted to ask you about the production techniques and working within the studio. When producing a track, would you say that you have a certain way of approaching tracks, a pattern, or is it random and messing around with different sounds?

We generally find that we work best when one of us makes the beat initially and then hand over to the other to first see if they are into it and then to work on it. There can be quite a bit of back and forth but that works really well for us. When we need to finish a track we often go into the studio together but with FaceTime we are often in our own studios working on separate tracks and then bouncing them across to the other to add some individual flavour.

Is there also a certain piece of hardware or software which you would use when producing a track, your “go-to” in the studio?

We both work in Logic and pretty much every track uses Battery 4 for drums and sample manipulation although we’ve got some outboard samplers too. We’ve just picked up the Electron Digitakt that is already looking like a lot of fun. We love Massive and have started adding some more outboard gear including some guitar pedals. One of the things that made the distorted siren sound in Cut Some Shapes was an old Boss Distortion pedal.

The album also contains a number of vocalists and other artists such as Neutrino, D Double E and many others. Do you find it easier to work with vocalists and fusing their vocal elements with the background production?

Our style really suits MCs and each of them have their own ways of working. Some prefer to record and send vocals over and then others come over and do it in the studio with us. I can say that Double is amazing to work with in the studio. Infectious enthusiasm and vibes on a hundred trillion. Such a G.

Finally, looking at the future of Riddim Commission, what can fans expect to see over the next few months in terms of music and shows?

We are still writing tunes. We’ve got a couple that need finishing ASAP actually. The goal is to get some live shows in before the end of the year: no rush as they have to be right. We want to bring out some of the artists that we have worked with to perform live with us. These days you can’t just drop and album and then disappear release wise. You need to feed the people and the DJs regularly. We both love writing music and DJing so that’s what we’ll do.

You can download the new album ‘Riddim. Bass. Life.’ here.

For more information on Riddim Commission:
https://www.facebook.com/RiddimCommission
https://twitter.com/riddimcomm
https://soundcloud.com/riddimcommission

Riddim Commission.

The UK Grime scene is one which is exploding at the moment as more and more artists break through to the mainstream music industry. However Riddim Commission, a House duo, have built a sound of fusing House with Grime, and the two have been hand in hand. The duo have just released their brand new album ‘Riddim. Bass. Life.’ which features a number of notable Grime names, and the support already has been incredible.

Taking things back to the start of your careers, tell us a little about how Riddim Commission came about. Where did you both meet? 

Marco reached out to me to remix a track of his called ‘Ho’. I was coming off the back of ‘StreetFighter Riddim’ for D Double and brought in P Money for the Ho Riddim remix. P killed it and the label and Marco decided to make it the main version.

Was this always the direction you both wanted to go down, enter the world of dance music, produce your own tracks and perform these tracks?

Riddim Commission.

When we started working together, it was always electronic, with grime and bass. After a while writing together we naturally gravitated to house tempos. To play your own productions out is the ultimate buzz, and to have the artists performing the tracks at the same time is the one. It’s what we are aiming for in our live sets.

Hailing from London, how influential was the city in influencing the sound you produce? It’s a mixture of House with grime elements.

London is such a melting pot of all kinds of culture it has to be a major influence.  We love to mix the styles in our music, house, bass, grime, hiphop, garage…the list goes on.  This hybrid is what makes the UK scene so special.

The grime scene has seen a massive rise in support as it enters the mainstream charts due to the success of Stormzy and other such artists. Do you believe that more and more artists will begin to feature grime elements, such as Riddim Commission?

Riddim Commission.

You can’t beat grime for the level of energy it brings to raves, and festivals plus it’s UK born. I’m sure you’ll see more and more grime artists featuring on projects outside of grime. As long as grime exists in its raw state in addition to the collaborations outside of the scene that’s a good thing. We are just focusing on doing our style and working with the artists we are really into across the board.

You have recently released your brand new album ‘Riddim. Bass. Life’. How easy did you find it to sit down in the studio and produce twelve tracks? Was there a stage where you lost belief in the project?

It wasn’t easy. Whenever you collaborate with artists you have to be aware of their schedule, their releases and things they have going on in their lives too. It took a couple of years to complete, write the tracks, secure the artists and decide what did and didn’t make the cut. It’s a great feeling knowing that we did it. There’s a reason why decent albums take time.  You need to have a lot of patience and be focused on finishing what you can when you can. Some stuff is out of your hands so you have to try not to sweat that.

I also wanted to ask you about the production techniques and working within the studio. When producing a track, would you say that you have a certain way of approaching tracks, a pattern, or is it random and messing around with different sounds?

Riddim Commission.

Is there also a certain piece of hardware or software which you would use when producing a track, your “go-to” in the studio?

We both work in Logic and pretty much every track uses Battery 4 for drums and sample manipulation although we’ve got some outboard samplers too. We’ve just picked up the Electron Digitakt that is already looking like a lot of fun. We love Massive and have started adding some more outboard gear including some guitar pedals. One of the things that made the distorted siren sound in Cut Some Shapes was an old Boss Distortion pedal.

The album also contains a number of vocalists and other artists such as Neutrino, D Double E and many others. Do you find it easier to work with vocalists and fusing their vocal elements with the background production?

Our style really suits MCs and each of them have their own ways of working. Some prefer to record and send vocals over and then others come over and do it in the studio with us. I can say that Double is amazing to work with in the studio. Infectious enthusiasm and vibes on a hundred trillion. Such a G.

Finally, looking at the future of Riddim Commission, what can fans expect to see over the next few months in terms of music and shows?

Riddim Commission.

We are still writing tunes. We’ve got a couple that need finishing ASAP actually. The goal is to get some live shows in before the end of the year: no rush as they have to be right. We want to bring out some of the artists that we have worked with to perform live with us. These days you can’t just drop and album and then disappear release wise. You need to feed the people and the DJs regularly. We both love writing music and DJing so that’s what we’ll do.

For more information on Riddim Commission:
https://www.facebook.com/RiddimCommission
https://twitter.com/riddimcomm
https://soundcloud.com/riddimcommission

 

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