Low Steppa: “Low Steppa Was Meant To Be”

Low Steppa was about to give up on his DJing career, but then it started to kick off, and it hasn't stopped...

| by | Features, Interviews

Hailing from Birmingham in the UK, Low Steppa has made an incredible rise to the top of the scene. His label Simma Black is a stand out source of music within the underground scene, while the label head himself has some renowned tracks in his collection. Constantly touring, the artist performs nearly every weekend with shows dotted in between, travelling from the UK to Ireland, Europe and the United States. A man on the mission, Low Steppa talks about how he nearly gave up, and how a DJing life can be tough.

The rise of Low Steppa on the scene has been short, but meteoric. With support coming in for numerous bootlegs you had produced, did you ever imagine yourself to become such a prominent name in the dance music world?

No not at all, I say this all the time but I believe if you do something for the right reasons, basically for the love of the music it will show, the whole Low Steppa is based on the very music I love, old soulful house and garage, funky house etc from back in the late 90s, early 2000s so I just enjoyed myself with it and its been a success, very thankful.

Was this always an ambition for you, to make your name and reputation in dance music? Or did you have other plans and this one just seemed to happen?

My dream was always to be a DJ. DJing seemed kind of magical when I was a kid, before the days of internet etc it had a lot more mystery to it and I was totally sucked in to the vinyl shopping and Technics and looked up massively to guys like Rampling and Lil Louie Vega. Its strange though, the only time I ever seriously considering giving it all up Low Steppa takes off! Therefore I believe it was meant to be.

Touring has become a big part of your career, with numerous dates confirmed for the coming months, as well as some big festival dates. How hard do you find touring or do you enjoy visiting different cities and clubs?

I wouldn’t ever change it but it can be so tiring, lonely too at times but I know how lucky I am too to have this life. Touring USA is brutal, getting bits of sleep here and there, spending whole days at airports and on planes but for that hour or two hours behind the decks it all falls into place. Being appreciated by people so far away and them knowing my records will never ever fail to blow my mind.

And as already mentioned, you have numerous festivals coming up over the next couple of months. Is there any you are particularly excited for?

Really excited for the back to back with Sonny Fodera at SW4, we did a few last year in Ibiza and they were such a laugh. Excited to play We Are as well. To be honest I go to every show whether its in small town somewhere or whether it’s a massive festival with one aim, to make people have a wicked time so I look forward to every show.

Which leads me to the question of going back to back with artists on stage. Sonny Fodera is an artist you have a couple of back to back sets coming up with. How different is it to perform with someone else, than just DJing yourself in the booth?

I love how you get more time to think about your next weapon to play, and there can be a certain degree of healthy competition, Sonny might drop a banger and I’ll be like right its like that is it haha, as we drink Tequila… Keeps you on your toes too, being out of the comfort zone, not knowing the records.

In terms of productions, you have numerous singles to the Low Steppa name, and each one seems to work itself into many fellow DJs sets. Would you say that you prefer to be in the studio producing music or in the club at the DJ booth?

I’ve answered this question differently over the years but answering it right now today I would say DJing. I feel my true place is in the DJ booth making people dance.

When you enter the studio however, do you have a set method, which you stick to, or is it just a matter of messing about and seeing what ideas you can come up with?

Yeah its total trial and error with me that’s why sometimes I shy away from working with other artists because I don’t really have set ways and day to day varies with what I like to make, deep, dusty, banging, tech, classic house, always in a different mood.

With many new talents rising up through the scene, and many beginning to produce their own tracks, what would be your production advice for an upcoming talent?

I think don’t rush into releasing, don’t remix too many tracks, try and work with a couple of labels you really want to be on. Now more than ever you have to try and stand out, there is so many promos every week, most of it all sounds the same so how does a DJ pick your track over other tracks? You have to try and come with something fresh to make your name.

Simma Black is also the label which you have started, which also supports many rising stars. Did you ever expect the label to do so well?

Again, the label was initially an outlet for my music, never expected it to be where it is now, over the moon with it, we just threw a party in New York too, was so good.

Rounding off, what can fans of Low Steppa expect over the coming months, in terms of you as an artist, and also in terms of your label Simma Black?

My track Can’t Lie is released on Armada in March and I have a follow up to that in May called ‘Don’t Stop’ featuring Joe Taylor. There are also some great EPs coming on Simma Black, we just try and be consistent and I think the fans appreciate that. Hopefully they feel they can look to the label for solid club / house records. There are some new Low Steppa singles coming, nice vocal tracks but at the same time there will be lots of new house records too for the clubs and the after parties.

Low Steppa will be performing at The Sesh in Limerick on February 27th. 

For more information on Low Steppa:
https://www.facebook.com/LOWSTEPPA
https://twitter.com/Lowsteppa
https://soundcloud.com/low-steppa

Low Steppa.

Hailing from Birmingham in the UK, Low Steppa has made an incredible rise to the top of the scene. His label Simma Black is a stand out source of music within the underground scene, while the label head himself has some renowned tracks in his collection. Constantly touring, the artist performs nearly every weekend with shows dotted in between, travelling from the UK to Ireland, Europe and the United States. A man on the mission, Low Steppa talks about how he nearly gave up, and how a DJing life can be tough.

The rise of Low Steppa on the scene has been short, but meteoric. With support coming in for numerous bootlegs you had produced, did you ever imagine yourself to become such a prominent name in the dance music world?

No not at all, I say this all the time but I believe if you do something for the right reasons, basically for the love of the music it will show, the whole Low Steppa is based on the very music I love, old soulful house and garage, funky house etc from back in the late 90s, early 2000s so I just enjoyed myself with it and its been a success, very thankful.

Was this always an ambition for you, to make your name and reputation in dance music? Or did you have other plans and this one just seemed to happen?

Low Steppa.

My dream was always to be a DJ. DJing seemed kind of magical when I was a kid, before the days of internet etc it had a lot more mystery to it and I was totally sucked in to the vinyl shopping and Technics and looked up massively to guys like Rampling and Lil Louie Vega. Its strange though, the only time I ever seriously considering giving it all up Low Steppa takes off! Therefore I believe it was meant to be.

Touring has become a big part of your career, with numerous dates confirmed for the coming months, as well as some big festival dates. How hard do you find touring or do you enjoy visiting different cities and clubs?

I wouldn’t ever change it but it can be so tiring, lonely too at times but I know how lucky I am too to have this life. Touring USA is brutal, getting bits of sleep here and there, spending whole days at airports and on planes but for that hour or two hours behind the decks it all falls into place. Being appreciated by people so far away and them knowing my records will never ever fail to blow my mind.

Low Steppa.

And as already mentioned, you have numerous festivals coming up over the next couple of months. Is there any you are particularly excited for?

Really excited for the back to back with Sonny Fodera at SW4, we did a few last year in Ibiza and they were such a laugh. Excited to play We Are as well. To be honest I go to every show whether its in small town somewhere or whether it’s a massive festival with one aim, to make people have a wicked time so I look forward to every show.

Which leads me to the question of going back to back with artists on stage. Sonny Fodera is an artist you have a couple of back to back sets coming up with. How different is it to perform with someone else, than just DJing yourself in the booth?

I love how you get more time to think about your next weapon to play, and there can be a certain degree of healthy competition, Sonny might drop a banger and I’ll be like right its like that is it haha, as we drink Tequila… Keeps you on your toes too, being out of the comfort zone, not knowing the records.

Low Steppa.

In terms of productions, you have numerous singles to the Low Steppa name, and each one seems to work itself into many fellow DJs sets. Would you say that you prefer to be in the studio producing music or in the club at the DJ booth?

I’ve answered this question differently over the years but answering it right now today I would say DJing. I feel my true place is in the DJ booth making people dance.

When you enter the studio however, do you have a set method, which you stick to, or is it just a matter of messing about and seeing what ideas you can come up with?

Yeah its total trial and error with me that’s why sometimes I shy away from working with other artists because I don’t really have set ways and day to day varies with what I like to make, deep, dusty, banging, tech, classic house, always in a different mood.

With many new talents rising up through the scene, and many beginning to produce their own tracks, what would be your production advice for an upcoming talent?

Low Steppa.

I think don’t rush into releasing, don’t remix too many tracks, try and work with a couple of labels you really want to be on. Now more than ever you have to try and stand out, there is so many promos every week, most of it all sounds the same so how does a DJ pick your track over other tracks? You have to try and come with something fresh to make your name.

Simma Black is also the label which you have started, which also supports many rising stars. Did you ever expect the label to do so well?

Again, the label was initially an outlet for my music, never expected it to be where it is now, over the moon with it, we just threw a party in New York too, was so good.

Rounding off, what can fans of Low Steppa expect over the coming months, in terms of you as an artist, and also in terms of your label Simma Black?

Low Steppa.

My track Can’t Lie is released on Armada in March and I have a follow up to that in May called ‘Don’t Stop’ featuring Joe Taylor. There are also some great EPs coming on Simma Black, we just try and be consistent and I think the fans appreciate that. Hopefully they feel they can look to the label for solid club / house records. There are some new Low Steppa singles coming, nice vocal tracks but at the same time there will be lots of new house records too for the clubs and the after parties.

Low Steppa will be performing at The Sesh in Limerick on February 27th. 

For more information on Low Steppa:
https://www.facebook.com/LOWSTEPPA
https://twitter.com/Lowsteppa
https://soundcloud.com/low-steppa

Comments

comments

TAGS