Why The Closure Of Fabric London Solves Nothing…

It was a shock to the UK nightlife sector and the worldwide dance music community, but here's why the closure of Fabric London solves nothing....

| by | Features, News

*This is the view of the writer, and may not run with the same views as crssbeat*

The closure of Fabric London has been a huge shock to the dance music industry, never mind the UK nightlife sector. A bit like The Arches in Glasgow which is just one of a few casualties in a war against nightlife. It is going to be a huge miss, such a miss to those in the younger generations that they will now never be able to experience one of the iconic dance music clubs, one at the heartland of such a renowned and vibrant dance music city.

A little background if you haven’t been following the story. Two nineteen year old men died following visiting the club in the last nine months due to drug overdoses. This led to Fabric London being closed down by the authorities for twenty-eight days, but this led to the overall closure of the club after authorities could not reach an agreement, and the council revoked the clubs license. A decision which has shocked many, and disappointed a whole lot more. Over one hundred and thirty thousand people signed a petition to try and save the club.

But how will the closure of such an iconic nightclub such as Fabric London really help the core problem which is drugs and drugs within dance music? In my opinion, a decision to shut down a club, which has prided itself as one of the front runners in dealing with drugs within the dance music scene for seventeen years now, was the wrong one. Instead of trying to implement new policies, to give the management a chance to try their best at reforming itself, they decided to shut down the club?

Within the dance music industry, there is a core problem of drugs. It’s there, it’s always going to be there as clubbers continue to take them. How can a nightclub such as Fabric London be punished for a problem, which just doesn’t run through the clubbing scene, but a problem which has been running through the UK and the world society as a whole. Drugs are always going to be a problem whether the local councils or government deal with it or not.

Recently The Secret Garden Party offered a service alongside The Loop that allowed those taking drugs to test exactly what was within the drugs they were taking, and it threw up a number of positive points. Over twenty five percent of those that tested their drugs threw them away, as they found out what was present within them. It is also showed that drugs which were sold as one thing, turned out to be an entirely different substance. These tests allowed those that were potentially going to take these drugs, to make an informed choice and decided whether or not they should take it or not. With this, it also allows clubs and festivals to find out exactly what sort of substances they are dealing with so that if an incident does occur, they can then immediately identify and find a solution. This is called dealing with a problem. Dealing with a problem in a safe way, and also working with the Police authorities.

So this brings us back to Fabric London. Why couldn’t the local authorities, along with the police and other charities such as The Loop, work together to offer tests such as these, to try and limit the amount of overdoses through drug use and to try and find a safer option. By doing so, it would make safer drug taking, local authorities know what they are dealing with and there is a level of regulation. What’s to stop clubbers standing in the streets and taking drugs now? Or down the road at another nightclub?

Regulation is another piece of the puzzle which could be looked into. As already mentioned, drugs are going to be a part of dance music. So you could look at the avenue of regulating the drugs, potentially looking at the factor that drugs are legalised, made safer, regulated exactly what is in them and try to take the so called “black market” out of it? Another point to potentially look at and another for the government to look at..

But the point which really shines through here is how unfair it is to punish Fabric London instead of working with the nightclub and the management. As already mentioned, what is to stop clubbers now going from Fabric to another nightclub and doing the exact same? Two hundred and fifty jobs have been lost because of the closure of Fabric. Does this mean that every nightclub which something along the same lines of Fabric happens to, will the authorities shut it down? Will it get to the point where we won’t have a nightlife sector, where if a problem occurs the authorities shut it down and simply don’t give a chance to reform it? Will nightclubs exist in ten years? It’s not looking likely. Oh and did we forget about the governments push to better the economy?

It’s a problem which runs deep within the communities and deep within society itself. It won’t go away, drugs are always going to be a problem. But shutting down a nightclub which wants to help reform, which wants to try and provide safer clubbing and wants to try and make those attendees have a great experience, I disagree with the decision.

I hope that the dance music community rallies together, to try and stop more closures such as Fabric happen again. I hope that we won’t be continuing to write articles surrounding club closures, where authorities are clamping down. Let’s make sure that we reform the society we are operating in, we provide safer clubbing, to try and stem deaths through drug overdoses or drug related problems. Let’s make sure that no more clubs are closed. I would like to say that I’m glad to see the likes of Sadiq Khan bringing forward initiatives to try and preserve the UK nightlife sector, but it shouldn’t just be him, it should be the UK government. Our politicians better pull the finger out soon…

We would like to take this moment to say good luck to the team behind Fabric and hopefully they can return to the nightlife sector as a bigger, better and improved clubbing facility. Save our nightlife. No matter where you are, the UK nightlife is under threat. Let’s stem the flow.

Note from the writer: I’m not pro-drugs as many of you may think by reading this. I’m pro-safe clubbing, a safe environment for everyone to enjoy themselves in the best way possible, to enjoy the incredible music which so many DJs have brought forth through the likes of Fabric, The Arches and many other of these great clubs. 

Photo Source: Fabric / Credit: Danny Seaton

Closure of Fabric London.

*This is the view of the writer, and may not run with the same views as crssbeat* closure of Fabric London

The closure of Fabric London has been a huge shock to the dance music industry, never mind the UK nightlife sector. A bit like The Arches in Glasgow which is just one of a few casualties in a war against nightlife. It is going to be a huge miss, such a miss to those in the younger generations that they will now never be able to experience one of the iconic dance music clubs, one at the heartland of such a renowned and vibrant dance music city.

A little background if you haven’t been following the story. Two nineteen year old men died following visiting the club in the last nine months due to drug overdoses. This led to Fabric London being closed down by the authorities for twenty-eight days, but this led to the overall closure of the club after authorities could not reach an agreement, and the council revoked the clubs license. A decision which has shocked many, and disappointed a whole lot more. Over one hundred and thirty thousand people signed a petition to try and save the club.

closure of Fabric London

But how will the closure of such an iconic nightclub such as Fabric London really help the core problem which is drugs and drugs within dance music? In my opinion, a decision to shut down a club, which has prided itself as one of the front runners in dealing with drugs within the dance music scene for seventeen years now, was the wrong one. Instead of trying to implement new policies, to give the management a chance to try their best at reforming itself, they decided to shut down the club?

Closure of Fabric London.

Within the dance music industry, there is a core problem of drugs. It’s there, it’s always going to be there as clubbers continue to take them. How can a nightclub such as Fabric London be punished for a problem, which just doesn’t run through the clubbing scene, but a problem which has been running through the UK and the world society as a whole. Drugs are always going to be a problem whether the local councils or government deal with it or not.

Recently The Secret Garden Party offered a service alongside The Loop that allowed those taking drugs to test exactly what was within the drugs they were taking, and it threw up a number of positive points. Over twenty five percent of those that tested their drugs threw them away, as they found out what was present within them. It is also showed that drugs which were sold as one thing, turned out to be an entirely different substance. These tests allowed those that were potentially going to take these drugs, to make an informed choice and decided whether or not they should take it or not. With this, it also allows clubs and festivals to find out exactly what sort of substances they are dealing with so that if an incident does occur, they can then immediately identify and find a solution. This is called dealing with a problem.

Closure Of Fabric London

So this brings us back to Fabric London. Why couldn’t the local authorities, along with the police and other charities such as The Loop, work together to offer tests such as these, to try and limit the amount of overdoses through drug use and to try and find a safer option. By doing so, it would make safer drug taking, local authorities know what they are dealing with and there is a level of regulation. What’s to stop clubbers standing in the streets and taking drugs now? Or down the road at another nightclub?

Regulation is another piece of the puzzle which could be looked into. As already mentioned, drugs are going to be a part of dance music. So you could look at the avenue of regulating the drugs, potentially looking at the factor that drugs are legalised, made safer, regulated exactly what is in them and try to take the so called “black market” out of it? Another point to potentially look at and another for the government to look at.

closure of Fabric London.

But the point which really shines through here is how unfair it is to punish Fabric London instead of working with the nightclub and the management. As already mentioned, what is to stop clubbers now going from Fabric to another nightclub and doing the exact same? 250 jobs have been lost because of the closure of Fabric. Does this mean that every nightclub which something along the same lines of Fabric happens to, will the authorities shut it down? Will it get to the point where we won’t have a nightlife sector, where if a problem occurs the authorities shut it down and simply don’t give a chance to reform it? Will nightclubs exist in ten years? It’s not looking likely.

Closure of Fabric London

It’s a problem which runs deep within the communities and deep within society itself. It won’t go away, drugs are always going to be a problem. But shutting down a nightclub which wants to help reform, which wants to try and provide safer clubbing and wants to try and make those attendees have a great experience, I disagree with the decision.

I hope that the dance music community rallies together, to try and stop more closures such as Fabric happen again. I hope that we won’t be continuing to write articles surrounding club closures, where authorities are clamping down. Let’s make sure that we reform the society we are operating in, we provide safer clubbing, to try and stem deaths through drug overdoses or drug related problems. Let’s make sure that no more clubs are closed. I would like to say that I’m glad to see the likes of Sadiq Khan bringing forward initiatives to try and preserve the UK nightlife sector, but it shouldn’t just be him, it should be the UK government. Our politicians better pull the finger out soon…

We would like to take this moment to say good luck to the team behind Fabric and hopefully they can return to the nightlife sector as a bigger, better and improved clubbing facility. Save our nightlife. No matter where you are, the UK nightlife is under threat. Let’s stem the flow.

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