Interview

Bad Royale: ‘The Result Of A Drunken Night’

Bad Royale talk about group formation, their newest single plus much more...

| by | Features, Interviews

Stories like these really make you think about how cool life is. Bad Royale consists for four people, four people who stumbled upon each other and have since made a major name for themselves. Collaborating with the likes of Major Lazer and other huge acts, as well as making their Caribbean Bass sound one of the most prominent on the scene, the group have been building such a solid reputation. Now they talk about how it all kicked off, bringing their own sound and talking about their new single ‘All I Can Do’.

It’s been a busy couple of years for Bad Royale as the group of four burst onto the scene and have achieved some pretty cool things. Taking things back though, how did all four come to work together? Where did it all begin for the group?

It all began in San Diego, California – we had all moved in together; the project came about by accident as the result of a drunken night’s joke.

The sound that you produce is described as ‘Caribbean Bass’, a mixture of bass sounds with those Dancehall like vibes. How did you manage to begin to produce this sound? Was it always the sound you aimed for?

Yes, that is correct. We wouldn’t necessarily say it was a sound we aimed for initially, it was only after being invited to Trinidad by Bunji Garlin, one of the major talents from the Caribbean, that we were really introduced to the music, and the culture, that formulated our sound.

In terms of influences, would you say that you have any particular influences in terms of other artists, and then outside of music, like surroundings or cities which you visit?

Everyone compares us to Major Lazer, which is one of our biggest influences in the dance scene, however, on the more worldly platform,
we are influenced by all the acts we have worked with directly. Every time we have travelled, or collaborated with anyone, no act in particular,
we have taken away something from them that has evolved our sound and moulded it into what it is today. That goes all the way from the smallest artists, up to the biggest.

As already mentioned, it has been a busy couple of years with collaborations alongside the likes of Major Lazer, covering Above & Beyond through an EP and much more. Can you sum up how the last couple of years have been?

It has been a roller coaster ride! A lot of it has been spent confined within the walls of our studios, which we don’t mind, that is where the creativity happens.

Most recently you have released your new single ‘All I Can Do’ which features the vocals of Silver. How did the idea come up for the track? What was it like to work with Silver in terms of fitting his vocals in with the track?

First off, congratulations is in order, to Silver, for his spectacular work on the track. His vocals and writing is absolutely stunning. As to how the idea for the track came up, we were all introduced by friends, as fellow musicians, and from there it’s kind of all history. One thing turned into another, we shared influences and inspiration, and before you know it we had this track.

Now the fact that three of you happen to be producers, can there be the odd clash of heads in the studio, disagreements on how ideas should go or turn out?

There is always going to be debate and an ongoing internal struggle as to who’s idea is the most applicable for the song. Most of the time to subvert any hostile disagreeance we combine the ideas together. You can notice this in many of our club records, there are a lot of elements that come out of left field but realistically it’s just us compromising on so many competing ideas.

I also wanted to ask about the production process of Bad Royale in the studio. How do you go about producing a track? Is there a particular method or routine which you carry out, or is it a matter of messing around and coming up with cool ideas?

We like to start with vocals if we can, but most of the time that isn’t available, so we just start wherever our heart desires. Usually we start by listening to a wide range of music, what is new, or checking out what our friends and colleagues have recently put out, what is happening overseas, in different languages. From there it becomes how you take that information and manipulate it.

In terms of the hardware and software which you may use, do you have a particular “go-to” piece which you use for the majority of your tracks?

We don’t have much hardware, we are software kind of people, but our go to piece of equipment is our microphones and our mouths. You can make some amazing sounds with a mouth.

Rounding off, what can fans look forward to hearing from Bad Royale in the coming months, with the Summer season beginning to take hold?

We have a lot of collaborations coming out this year. We can’t say with who yet, but they are being announced very soon. As well as a couple more singles, and some heavy stuff too.

With the huge amount of talents out there on the scene now, is there any you recommend we keep an eye out for over the next six to twelve months?

There is a collective of individuals in Trinidad making some moves, Mark Hardy, Jimmy October, Jay Nahge, Mical Teja, Tano, System 32, Voice, Preedy, Nailah Blackman, Orlando Octave, Azaryah, and Marvay. They are young and talented handful of individuals from the island country, and we have had the pleasure of working with most of them in one way or another. Also, we can’t forget the man who started it all with us, Richie Loop, from Jamaica, he is a super talent, he should be on 24/7 watch, he is always doing something creative.

Finally, what would be your one piece of advice for an upcoming DJ or producer looking to break onto the scene?

Don’t try to be like anyone, try to be better.

For more information on Bad Royale:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/badroyale
https://twitter.com/badroyalemusic
https://soundcloud.com/badroyale

Bad Royale.

Stories like these really make you think about how cool life is. Bad Royale consists for four people, four people who stumbled upon each other and have since made a major name for themselves. Collaborating with the likes of Major Lazer and other huge acts, as well as making their Caribbean Bass sound one of the most prominent on the scene, the group have been building such a solid reputation. Now they talk about how it all kicked off, bringing their own sound and talking about their new single ‘All I Can Do’.

It’s been a busy couple of years for Bad Royale as the group of four burst onto the scene and have achieved some pretty cool things. Taking things back though, how did all four come to work together? Where did it all begin for the group?

It all began in San Diego, California – we had all moved in together; the project came about by accident as the result of a drunken night’s joke.

The sound that you produce is described as ‘Caribbean Bass’, a mixture of bass sounds with those Dancehall like vibes. How did you manage to begin to produce this sound? Was it always the sound you aimed for?

Bad Royale.

Yes, that is correct. We wouldn’t necessarily say it was a sound we aimed for initially, it was only after being invited to Trinidad by Bunji Garlin, one of the major talents from the Caribbean, that we were really introduced to the music, and the culture, that formulated our sound.

In terms of influences, would you say that you have any particular influences in terms of other artists, and then outside of music, like surroundings or cities which you visit?

Everyone compares us to Major Lazer, which is one of our biggest influences in the dance scene, however, on the more worldly platform,
we are influenced by all the acts we have worked with directly. Every time we have travelled, or collaborated with anyone, no act in particular,
we have taken away something from them that has evolved our sound and moulded it into what it is today. That goes all the way from the smallest artists, up to the biggest.

As already mentioned, it has been a busy couple of years with collaborations alongside the likes of Major Lazer, covering Above & Beyond through an EP and much more. Can you sum up how the last couple of years have been?

It has been a roller coaster ride! A lot of it has been spent confined within the walls of our studios, which we don’t mind, that is where the creativity happens.

Most recently you have released your new single ‘All I Can Do’ which features the vocals of Silver. How did the idea come up for the track? What was it like to work with Silver in terms of fitting his vocals in with the track?

Bad Royale.

First off, congratulations is in order, to Silver, for his spectacular work on the track. His vocals and writing is absolutely stunning. As to how the idea for the track came up, we were all introduced by friends, as fellow musicians, and from there it’s kind of all history. One thing turned into another, we shared influences and inspiration, and before you know it we had this track.

Now the fact that three of you happen to be producers, can there be the odd clash of heads in the studio, disagreements on how ideas should go or turn out?

There is always going to be debate and an ongoing internal struggle as to who’s idea is the most applicable for the song. Most of the time to subvert any hostile disagreeance we combine the ideas together. You can notice this in many of our club records, there are a lot of elements that come out of left field but realistically it’s just us compromising on so many competing ideas.

I also wanted to ask about the production process of Bad Royale in the studio. How do you go about producing a track? Is there a particular method or routine which you carry out, or is it a matter of messing around and coming up with cool ideas?

Bad Royale.

We like to start with vocals if we can, but most of the time that isn’t available, so we just start wherever our heart desires. Usually we start by listening to a wide range of music, what is new, or checking out what our friends and colleagues have recently put out, what is happening overseas, in different languages. From there it becomes how you take that information and manipulate it.

In terms of the hardware and software which you may use, do you have a particular “go-to” piece which you use for the majority of your tracks?

We don’t have much hardware, we are software kind of people, but our go to piece of equipment is our microphones and our mouths. You can make some amazing sounds with a mouth.

Rounding off, what can fans look forward to hearing from Bad Royale in the coming months, with the Summer season beginning to take hold?

We have a lot of collaborations coming out this year. We can’t say with who yet, but they are being announced very soon. As well as a couple more singles, and some heavy stuff too.

Bad Royale.

With the huge amount of talents out there on the scene now, is there any you recommend we keep an eye out for over the next six to twelve months?

There is a collective of individuals in Trinidad making some moves, Mark Hardy, Jimmy October, Jay Nahge, Mical Teja, Tano, System 32, Voice, Preedy, Nailah Blackman, Orlando Octave, Azaryah, and Marvay. They are young and talented handful of individuals from the island country, and we have had the pleasure of working with most of them in one way or another. Also, we can’t forget the man who started it all with us, Richie Loop, from Jamaica, he is a super talent, he should be on 24/7 watch, he is always doing something creative.

Finally, what would be your one piece of advice for an upcoming DJ or producer looking to break onto the scene?

Don’t try to be like anyone, try to be better.

For more information on Bad Royale:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/badroyale
https://twitter.com/badroyalemusic
https://soundcloud.com/badroyale

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